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Solar Airplane Traverses Atlantic Ocean

Bertrand Piccard has just completed the first traversal of the Atlantic Ocean in an entirely solar-powered airplane. The story is fascinating. Merrit Kennedy of NPR writes:

Piccard had to try to avoid clouds, or fly above them, so that the plane could use the sun's power to charge its batteries. The plane also climbs to higher altitudes during the day, collecting potential energy, and then uses that stored energy to descend to lower altitudes as night falls. As the team explains, that's "a ...

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Are Solar Panels a Good Fit for Your Home?

John Weaver has written an informative guide to installing solar panels on your rooftop for Elektrek, beginning with some information designed to help you discover if solar panels are a good fit for your particular home. Rooftop installations aren't right for everyone:

While the National Renewable Energy Lab thinks the US can get 40% of its electricity from rooftops – they estimate only 22-27% of residential roofs have solar power potential.

If you've ever considered taking some amount of your household's power generation ...

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Solar May Leapfrog Fossil Fuels in Developing World

In POWER magazine, Lee Buchsbaum writes that investment in renewable energy sources hit an all-time high in 2015, particularly in developing nations. Indeed, in areas where traditional power grids are still coming online, the changing economics of generation may lead to a situation in which solar and wind "leapfrog" fossil fuels:

According to a Mercatus Energy Investment Management’s Global Advanced Energy Insights Report, the $12 trillion flooding into the market over the next few years—mainly into the developing world—is funding an “energy ...

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Widespread Solar Power Isn't Coming...Yet

Brad Plumer looks into (for Vox.com) the current best estimations as to when, exactly, solar power will become economically viable enough to supply a substantial proportion of our power needs:

[...] the industry should set a goal of pushing the installed price of solar to $0.25 per watt by 2050 — down from around $3 per watt today. That's a mind-bogglingly low number, and it could require thinking about solar innovation in a radically new way. Current approaches to cutting costs won't necessarily ...

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